Religious freedom is hanging by a thread

E.J. Dionne boasts of American voters’ respect for religious freedom, in that while 55% to 59% of people say that private business should not be legally permitted to refuse to provide services to same-sex weddings, 61% said that a clergy member or church should have the right to refuse to officiate the ceremony.

First of all, the fact that only 6 in 10 voters would agree that the government should not be allowed to force a church or clergy member to officiate a homosexual wedding should indicate how our religious freedom hangs by a tiny and fraying thread. If we lived in a nation that truly respected religious freedom, that number would be at least 85%. A shift in public opinion of only 12 percentage points would leave that group as a plurality at best.

Dionne knows that public opinion can shift quickly and dramatically – look at how rapidly homosexual marriage is gaining support among the American people, when such a rapid and dramatic shift that would have been unthinkable just ten years ago. For Dionne to tout the truly pathetic and dangerously low margin of 61% as some sort of a grantee of religious freedom is either dishonest or incredibly naïve – and it is almost certainly the former.

The entire point of the limitations on government in our Bill of Rights is that it does not matter what a majority of the voters think. Rights are not subject to majority rule, and government may not abridge our rights just because it is politically popular.

This is why we need to stand firm on freedom of association and not compromise on religious freedom and freedom of association. It is a very short leap from having government force a Christian business owner to participate in a homosexual wedding to having government force churches and/or clergy to officiate a same-sex wedding. It is obvious that the homosexual lobby – the goal of which has always been mandatory, state-enforced acceptance, not tolerance – is in the process of incrementally breaking down the barriers that our Constitution places between government and religious freedom.

5 thoughts on “Religious freedom is hanging by a thread

  1. I'm sorry, Scott. To argue that it's a religious freedom to treat your neighbors as lesser than you is to argue that bigotry was a main pillar of the teachings of Jesus Christ, and that's not the Jesus I remember learning about in Sunday School as a child and in Bible studies as a college student.

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  2. First you say: “61% said that a clergy member or church should have the right to officiate the ceremony.”

    The you say: “the fact that only 6 in 10 voters would agree that the government should not be allowed to force a church or clergy member to officiate a homosexual wedding should indicate how our religious freedom hangs by a tiny and fraying thread.'

    How does having “the right to officiate” at a wedding translate into “being forced by government” to do so? You're so strung out on hatred for gays that you're losing your grip on logic and your own native language. Snap out of it, for your children's sake, if no other reason. It's pathetic and ridiculous.

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  3. Jesus would never have made a wedding cake for a homosexual couple, because homosexuality was prohibited by the very Law that He handed down.

    Jesus would also never advocate that His followers be forced to participate in something that He declared to be a sin and prohibited in His Law.

    Jesus' teaching was love the sinner, hate the sin. That's exactly the principle behind not forcing anyone to serve a same-sex wedding – or any other unbiblical wedding, such as a marriage of a believer and an unbeliever.

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