10 thoughts on “No one wins when pulpits aren’t free

  1. The law governing religious “charities” clearly bans endorsement of candidates or parties and other political involvement Churches can (and should) lose their grossly undeserved tax exemptions for breaking such laws. Monitoring is the only way to catch them at it, whether they're ranting on TV or in some little holler in the backwoods. Of course, taxing churches like the businesses they are would solve the problem overnight.

    Like

  2. A truly stupid rebuttal. The administrative rule in question says that an organization cannot both engage in political advocacy/activity AND file their income taxes as a non-profit. They have to choose one or the other.

    This rule applies to secular organizations as well as religious ones. The Red Cross cannot advocate for a particular presidential candidate AND claim exemption from paying taxes on its income just as the Catholic Church cannot do so.

    To try and desperately wrap this up as some kind of assault on free speech when a) we are talking about corporations, not human beings and b) it's not a free speech issue at all, is the worse kind of disingenuous special pleading under a pitiful cover of so-called oppression.

    It's not. How utterly pathetic to try and claim otherwise.

    Like

  3. Corporations also have free speech rights under the Constitution, as SCOTUS confirmed in 2010. People do not lose their free speech rights when they organize themselves into a corporation.

    The First Amendment does not make an exception for corporate speech.

    More importantly, it is a violation of the free exercise of religion clause in the First Amendment for the Obama regime to be policing what is said in sermons. It's illegal, plain and simple.

    It's none of the Obama regime's business business what is said from the pulpit.

    Like

  4. “It's none of the Obama regime's business business what is said from the pulpit.”

    And of course, as you must know, you're dead wrong under the tax code governing “charities” barred from meddling in politics. Political churches are no different than any other tax-dodging gang of racketeers, aside from claiming undeserved special “rights” with respect to their “faith.” Tax them all and the problem vanishes.

    Like

  5. “The Constitution trumps the tax code.”

    And since it grants no tax exemption to churches, your argument is irrelevant. The IRS does bit in any way abridge church doctrine or behavior; it simply applies existing law and forces dishonest preachers to abide by the rules they accepted when pleading to be tax-exempt.

    Like

  6. My 8:30 am comment was in response to MN's 8:23 am comment.

    The IRS does bit in any way abridge church doctrine or behavior

    When the IRS is policing sermons and threatening punishment for things Obama does not like in those sermons, it most certainly is. That's illegal, plain and simple.

    Like

  7. “Corporations also have free speech rights under the Constitution, as SCOTUS confirmed in 2010. People do not lose their free speech rights when they organize themselves into a corporation.”

    No, but they do gain the right to enjoy their income without paying taxes on that income. There's no such thing as a “nonprofit” individual, we all have to pay income taxes on our income.

    Except that is for those super people we call corporations who have additional rights over the rest of us regular people.

    You are utterly confused about what is and what is not a right and what is and what does not constitute an abridgment of free speech and/or congress' recognition of an establishment of religion.

    The churches were granted a privilege that most of us don't have, namely the ability to enjoy their income without having to pay taxes on it. The stipulation was that they not abuse that privilege for political ends.

    They want to have their cake and eat it to. There's a word for that and, no, it's not tyranny. It's selfishness.

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s