Democrats are gaslighting on the food and beverage tax

The food and beverage tax was a fraud and a hoax from the very beginning. It was presented in dishonesty and passed with contempt for transparency and disrespect for constituents. Now Democrats are gaslighting constituents as they perform a bait and switch, using funds from the tax for a purpose other than what we were promised.

For years, we have been told we need a food and beverage tax to expand the convention center. The building is too small and we are missing out on economic opportunity, we have been told. An effort to pass the tax in 2013 failed, but these things never go away. The Left always keeps pushing for what they want, and they will not stop until they get it.

The Democrats finally passed the food and beverage tax in 2017. The tax would fall hard on Indiana University students, so the county council naturally held the vote during a time when students were extremely busy with final exams. This was a shameful display of disrespect for the economic engine that keeps Monroe County afloat.

Now, the Democrats want to pull a bait and switch and use the county’s portion of the money for projects other than the convention center. The reasoning for the tax was a fraud and a hoax from the very beginning. Worse yet, Democrats are now actively gaslighting their own constituents, pretending that it had always been the case that the county’s share of the money was intended for other things. It is shameful, but is to be expected from Democrats in Monroe County. To see how obviously false this claim is, check out the quoted text and links at the bottom of this blog post.

The state legislature needs to step in and revoke the county’s authority to collect a food and beverage tax. When we are subjected to this kind of behavior from our local officials, the next level up needs to protect taxpayers. Republicans hold a super-majority in both chambers of the Indiana legislature, so there is no reason this should not pass. Are you listening, Governor Holcomb?

The countywide tax would be a funding source for a proposed expansion of the Monroe Convention Center.

Source: The Herald-Times.

If adopted, the tax is expected to raise between $2.5 and $3 million annually and would help pay for a projected $72 million convention center expansion project in downtown Bloomington.

Source: The Herald-Times.

If county council members vote next week, they should approve a 1 percent food and beverage tax to help finance the construction of a larger and more modern convention center downtown.

Source: The Herald-Times.

The Monroe County Council narrowly voted Wednesday to adopt a 1 percent food and beverage tax to help pay for the expansion of the Monroe Convention Center

Source: The Herald-Times.

The Monroe County Council made a good decision in approving a 1 percent food and beverage tax to help expand the Monroe Convention Center in downtown Bloomington.

Source: The Herald-Times.

The approval of a countywide food and beverage tax is a first step toward expanding the convention center in downtown Bloomington.

Source: The Herald-Times.

The purpose of the tax is to help finance the expansion of the downtown Monroe Convention Center.

Source: The Herald-Times.

Funds from (the food and beverage tax) will develop the south side of downtown by creating a public amenity with the expanded convention center.

Source: The Herald-Times.

The Monroe County Council adopted the tax in December as a funding mechanism for an expanded convention center.

Source: The Herald-Times.

With a new countywide tax approved — and to take effect Thursday — to help fund the expansion of the Monroe Convention Center, project representatives are ready to move forward.

Source: The Herald-Times.

Throughout discussions about the food and beverage tax, proponents said the majority of the revenue will be used to expand the Monroe Convention Center and build an accompanying hotel.

Source: The Herald-Times.

He was advocating a 1 percent food and beverage tax the Monroe County Council would have to approve. We’ve supported that, too, for ongoing expenses connected to a convention center project.

Source: The Herald-Times.

The most recent serious attempt to move the expansion idea forward died in 2013 when the county council stopped short of passing a food and beverage tax to fund the project.

Source: The Herald-Times.

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