The implications of being a “publisher” or a “platform”

When you want the federal government to “do something,” always assume that proposed action will eventually be used against you. It is terribly na├»ve to do otherwise. The power you grant the government when controlled by people you like will also be available to the government when it is controlled by people you do not like. That is the primary lesson I wish conservatives would take from designating Twitter and Facebook as “publishers” instead of platforms.

There is a lot of talk on the Right about designating both Facebook and Twitter as “publishers” instead of a “platforms.” This is not totally without merit, especially as both platforms are increasingly using editorial standards for content. Facebook’s algorithm controls what you see in your news feed, and Twitter is moving toward making dissent on transgender ideology unwelcome on the site. A site like the Daily Wire, which screens every post, is liable for content posted there. Twitter, Facebook, MySpace, message boards and blog/website comment sections are not. If Facebook and Twitter are going to be implementing editorial standards on user posts, should they be treated as publishers?

No.

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